Decoding MQI constants

On Twitter, Michael asked: “any logic or hints on how to interpret the PCF parameter names returned as multiples from the com.ibm.mq.headers.pcf?” Which is a very good question but a proper answer is far too long to type there. There are several different ways that you can approach the problem, depending on what you are trying to do. So this post talks about decoding MQI constants.

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This post was last updated on December 2nd, 2021 at 01:45 pm

What did Spring do to my queue manager

If you’ve done any work with the Spring frameworks for Java programs, then you will know that one of the good things about Spring is that it hides a lot of the underlying operations from you. But equally, one of the bad things about Spring is that it hides a lot of the underlying operations from you. I noticed that I was getting several questions about what was happening under the covers from people using the MQ Spring Boot starter. This post shows how you can see what Spring is doing to a queue manager.

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This post was last updated on May 4th, 2021 at 08:50 pm

MQ JMS application development with Spring Boot

Application developers who are working in Java, using the JMS interface, often choose to work with the Spring Framework. Spring can simplify the coding of new applications by providing templates for common patterns, and has been successfully used for many
years
with the MQ JMS classes. The JmsTemplate class in Spring is the key interface here, but it still relies on having dependencies and configurations defined or coded.

The Spring Framework includes several modules for different capabilities. One of these components is Spring Boot. Spring
Boot starters conveniently pull in all the dependencies and auto-configuration libraries required to use a particular technology. This makes it very easy to get going with a new application and technology, faster than working directly with classes like JmsTemplate. So how can we enable this easy access for MQ applications?

In this post I described how MQ’s Java classes are available for direct download from Maven Central Repository. And we have now exploited that to create a Spring Boot Starter for MQ. You can download full source code for the module from GitHub.

Getting started with MQ Spring Boot

This post was last updated on November 20th, 2019 at 09:14 pm

Developing Java applications for MQ just got easier with Maven

Introduction

This post talks about a simpler way to develop Java applications for MQ, using a Maven repository to automatically install dependencies.

Application development for MQ requires access to the language-specific interfaces, libraries, headers, DLLs etc. You write an application and, depending on the language, the MQ-provided components are used within the IDE while you are writing code, checked during build processes, or referenced at runtime. If you want to make your application available to other people, then they will need access to at least the runtime MQ interfaces.

We made it much easier to distribute applications with the release of the MQ Redistributable Client packages.

And now we’ve also made it easier to write Java applications, so that you do not need to explicitly install anything before using MQ’s interfaces.

See more about setting up dependencies for your Java program

This post was last updated on February 9th, 2021 at 12:13 pm